• April 19Anyone interested in in running cross country next year, there will be a meeting in room 412 on April 27th.

  • March 6Yearbooks are on sale through April 27th

  • March 2Prom tickets are on sale in Mrs. Alford's room 401 for $20, Prom will be April 21 st

Hazelwood: Then and Now

Ashley Burke and Ella Leach

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Wednesday, January 31 was the 30 year anniversary of the Hazelwood Court Case.  This case is probably one of the biggest cases involving freedom of speech in high school, even though it isn’t always taught in classes like American Government or other history classes.  This issue was first brought up when students in the Journalism II class at Hazelwood High School wrote an article about divorce and teen pregnancy. Their principle said that these articles were too explicit and were not appropriate for younger students.  Therefore, these articles were not allowed to be put in the paper.

 One of the students took this to the Supreme Court and said that the principal was taking away her First Amendment right. The case went to the eighth circuit court where the ruling was in favor of the students, but then the Supreme Court decided that the case was important enough that they wanted to make the official ruling. Their ruling on the case was in favor of the school. Their ruling, according to the New York Times, was based on the fact that, “Educators do not offend the First Amendment by exercising editorial control over the style and content of student speech in school-sponsored expressive activities,” the Court said, “so long as their actions are reasonably related to legitimate [educational] concerns.”  

 As a result, this has taken away some of students free speech.  Schools are allowed to censor and restrict what’s put in newspapers, theatrical productions, yearbooks, creative writing writing assignments, and campaign and graduation speeches.  Currently, Missouri is trying to pass the Walter Cronkite New Voices Act that gives high school students in Missouri these First Amendment rights back.

 Similar acts have been passed in Arkansas, Kansas, Iowa, Colorado, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Oregon, California, Nevada, North Dakota, Illinois, Maryland, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Why hasn’t this been passed in Missouri? It has been up for vote three times in recent years making it through the house multiple times with staggering votes of 131-12 in favor of the act, but has never made it through the senate. They claim it just isn’t that big of an issue like same-sex marriage and has just gotten swept under the rug. However, there are organizations like SPLC, Student Press Law Center, and ACLU, American Civil Liberties Union, who are trying to help fight to give students back their rights.

Wednesday, January 31 was the 30 year anniversary of the Hazelwood Court Case.  This case is probably one of the biggest cases involving freedom of speech in high school, even though it isn’t always taught in classes like American Government or other history classes.  This issue was first brought up when students in the Journalism II class at Hazelwood High School wrote an article about divorce and teen pregnancy. Their principle said that these articles were too explicit and were not appropriate for younger students.  Therefore, these articles were not allowed to be put in the paper.

 One of the students took this to the Supreme Court and said that the principal was taking away her First Amendment right. The case went to the eighth circuit court where the ruling was in favor of the students, but then the Supreme Court decided that the case was important enough that they wanted to make the official ruling. Their ruling on the case was in favor of the school. Their ruling, according to the New York Times, was based on the fact that, “Educators do not offend the First Amendment by exercising editorial control over the style and content of student speech in school-sponsored expressive activities,” the Court said, “so long as their actions are reasonably related to legitimate [educational] concerns.”  

 As a result, this has taken away some of students free speech.  Schools are allowed to censor and restrict what’s put in newspapers, theatrical productions, yearbooks, creative writing writing assignments, and campaign and graduation speeches.  Currently, Missouri is trying to pass the Walter Cronkite New Voices Act that gives high school students in Missouri these First Amendment rights back.

 Similar acts have been passed in Arkansas, Kansas, Iowa, Colorado, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Oregon, California, Nevada, North Dakota, Illinois, Maryland, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Why hasn’t this been passed in Missouri? It has been up for vote three times in recent years making it through the house multiple times with staggering votes of 131-12 in favor of the act, but has never made it through the senate. They claim it just isn’t that big of an issue like same-sex marriage and has just gotten swept under the rug. However, there are organizations like SPLC, Student Press Law Center, and ACLU, American Civil Liberties Union, who are trying to help fight to give students back their rights.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Hazelwood: Then and Now

    Student Life

    Rolling into Psychology

  • Hazelwood: Then and Now

    Student Life

    A Round of Problems

  • Hazelwood: Then and Now

    Student Life

    Virus Slams K-1

  • Hazelwood: Then and Now

    Student Life

    Homegrown Winners

  • Hazelwood: Then and Now

    Student Life

    Rolling into Psychology

  • Hazelwood: Then and Now

    Student Life

    A Round of Problems

  • Opinion

    Stop asking me where I want to go to college

  • News

    Spring Break

  • Hazelwood: Then and Now

    News

    The Modern Slave

  • Entertainment

    Studio Ghibli

Hazelwood: Then and Now